Canon

Every published work of fiction and poetry and every publicly performed work of drama by the author E. Christopher Clark is canon in the Clarkwoods Literary Universe. This is possible due to the cyclical nature of reality in the CLU.

(Yes: we did just use the phrase “the cyclical nature of reality” in a sentence. But this is an encyclopedia for a fictional universe, silly pants. Yes, we’re dorks for writing it. But you’re a dork for reading it. Welcome to the club. Membership has its privileges.)

Earth-669 is the designation given to the current iteration of the universe. The number was chosen because it brings to mind both a sexual position and the number of the beast. If pressed, Clark might tell you that he picked it to evoke one of his favorite Nine Inch Nails lyrics (“the devil wants to fuck me in the back of his car”)—a lyric that encompasses, all in one sentence, the humor, horror, and salaciousness with which Clark hopes to imbue his work. But he might be bullshitting you.

Most of Clark’s published work takes place in the Earth-669 iteration. This includes: The Seven Wives of Silver, Bad Poetry Night, Missing Mr. Wingfield, Out of the Woods, the 2014 editions of All He Left Behind and Those Little Bastards (with exception of the story “Revelation”), and the works published in Clarkwoods.com’s “Stories” section.

Other works take place in earlier iterations of CLU’s reality. These include: the mid-90s comic book series Blood Red, the 2002 edition of Those Little Bastards (intentionally misspelled Those Little Bastads for reasons far too convoluted to get into here), the 2010 edition of All He Left Behind, the works published in Clarkwoods.com’s “Blog” section, any works published in outside magazines and anthologies, and all of Clark’s publicly performed stage plays.

The short story “Revelation,” published in both editions of Those Little Bastards, takes place in the iteration of CLU’s reality that occurred just before the Earth-669 iteration (Earth-668, if you will). It is because of her remorse over the events depicted in this story that Emily Henderson travels through time to “correct” history (as seen in the story “Deus ex Machina”), rebooting reality in the process.